20190210

2019-5 Readings of the week

NOTE: The themes are varied, and some links below are affiliate links. Software/data engineering, psychology, formal systems. Expect a similar wide range in the future as well. You can check all my weekly readings by checking the tag here . You can also get these as a weekly newsletter by subscribing here.

Playing with Rust

I've known Pere for several years, and I'm glad to see his views on Rust. Looks like not every Scala developer has to move from Scala to Haskell.

Try out walrus operator in Python 3.8

I am the egg man, they are the egg men, I am the PEP 572: Goo goo g'joob. Well, or not. This feels very un-pythonic, and we all know the amount of flak BDFL got for that. But oh well, it's in Python 3.8-dev. Let this serve as the weekly reminder that pyenv is excellent.

Cognitive Journaling: A Systematic Method to Overcome Negative Beliefs

Last year I had been journaling on and off, and this year I have been consistent, every day so far since New Year. This has interesting approaches to understand your mind better.

How Jeff Bezos Turned Narrative into Amazon's Competitive Advantage

This idea is gold, but the HackerNews comments are better than the original article.

Model Metropolis

I read about Forrester's Urban Dynamics in the excellent Thinking in Systems from Donella Meadows. And this also talks about SimCity, what else could I want?

A Humility Training Exercise for Technical Interviewers

The idea presented here is powerful: learn to remove biases from your interviews. As an occasional interviewer (and interviewee), I can totally see how this can help.

pandas blog – Pandas Extension Arrays

Extension arrays show a lot of promise, and right now there is work underway for Pandas extension arrays based on Arrow (fletcher). Although the cool work will happen when the underlying memory layout and building blocks of Pandas are actually Arrow... And that is underway as well.

Demystifying JOIN Algorithms

A very good explanation of basic join algorithms, with a pseudocode that looks pretty much like Python

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These weekly posts are also available as a newsletter. These days (since RSS went into limbo) most of my regular information comes from several newsletters I’m subscribed to, instead of me going directly to a blog. If this is also your case, subscribe by clicking here.
Written by Ruben Berenguel

20190205

2019-4 Readings of the week

Sorry for the delay, Sunday was my birthday (also, Elmo’s, and The Day The Music Died as well) and I spent the day without access to a computer.


NOTE: The themes are varied. Software/data engineering, psychology, formal systems. Expect a similar wide range in the future as well. You can check all my weekly readings by checking the tag here . You can also get these as a weekly newsletter by subscribing here.

The Art of Decision-Making

An overview of (what looks like) pop-sci books on decision making. There are some interesting ideas, especially regarding aspiration vs ambition.

The Soviet license plate game and Kolmogorov complexity

Excellent post as usual by John D. Cook mixing something interesting with a bit of mathematical analysis (which is also obviously interesting). Also makes Soviet license plates sound more interesting than they should.

Spark surprises for the uninitiated

I’ve known about the pain of non-deterministic Spark operators (went down some of the codebase rabbit holes while investigating a weird predicate push down rule I suspect is conceptually wrong). This post will actually get you scared: how do you test this?

Regrettable Code, Episode 1

A history about profiling a Python application and the accumulation of small decisions that lead to a large performance bottleneck.

High-Performance in Python with Zero-Copy and the Buffer Protocol

I wasn’t aware of the buffer class/protocol in Python, but it looks like something I should be aware of.

Simulating blobs of fluid

A long long time ago, I can still remember, I loved creating visualizations and animations. I still do, I just don’t have the time. Otherwise, I’d implement this.

Ask HN: Top three questions for a startup before accepting a job offer?

Not the first time a similar question has been asked in Hacker News, but it’s good to keep a few of this stored for future reference.

Ray: Application-level scheduling with custom resources

Dask and Ray are next in my list of stuff I want to try. I love Spark, and love Scala, but the more tools in my belt, the better an engineer I can be.

Rust on iOS

An updated tutorial on using a Rust library in a Swift application for iOS. I have tried, it actually works. I need a time machine or something.

Thread Pool Best Practices with ZIO

The idea reminds me of how the Go (Golang) scheduler handles the mapping between goroutines and OS threads.

The Kubernetes Scheduler

An awesome post about the Kubernetes scheduler and its internal workings, with partial TLA+ specs of the moving pieces. It may be a bit over-the-top if you don’t know a lot about K8s internals or any TLA+, but if you know a bit of two, you’re in for a treat.

Shadows used to peer around corners

Technique to peek behind corners from a still picture.

Queueing theory: The science of waiting in line

Another one by John (I think he has won the readings of this week? There’s no prize, though). I’m a mathematician by training, so I didn’t get to study some of the cool (and, according to CS major friends, boring) stuff I love to hear about, like... queuing theory.

Newsletter?

These weekly posts are also available as a newsletter. These days (since RSS went into limbo) most of my regular information comes from several newsletters I’m subscribed to, instead of me going directly to a blog. If this is also your case, subscribe by clicking here.
Written by Ruben Berenguel

20190127

2019-3 Readings of the week

NOTE: The themes are varied. Software/data engineering, history, formal systems. Expect a similar wide range in the future as well. You can check all weekly readings by checking the tag here . You can also get these as a weekly newsletter by subscribing here.

Fermentation and Daily Life

I’m not a fan of fermented food, but my girlfriend is. The article is interesting even for me.

Why Are Young People Pretending to Love Work?

The “grind and hustle” gets old pretty quick.

📚 Specifying Systems

The book for learning TLA+ (and, free to download from the link above). I’m reading it right now, step by step. You can also get a paperback version from Amazon (affiliate link) but it's kind of expensive.

The Perils and Pleasures of Bartending in Antarctica

It kind of makes sense.

“O Uommibatto”: How the Pre-Raphaelites Became Obsessed with the Wombat

Whomwhat?

Why Don’t People Use Formal Methods?

As you may have realized, I’m interested in formal methods and verification. I’m not the only one, and since I now pay more attention to articles on the subject, I find more articles to share. Hillel is the author of Practical TLA+ (affiliate link), the book that finally got me to write specs.

The 1859 Carrington Event

The idea of this happening “now” is actually scary.

Ask HN: What are your “brain hacks” that help you manage everyday situations?

You may pick up one or two tricks that can be useful.

What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?

Here, take this sugar pill. You’ll be cured.

Kafka at Criteo

Slides from Slideshare. The scale is astounding. Note that the engineering blog at Criteo is top notch, but your adblocker is probably going to give you a hard time reading it.

When Rust is safer than Haskell

I’m closer to doing useful stuff in Rust than in Haskell, so it’s always good to know Rust has some nice tricks up its sleeve.

Inductive invariants

More TLA+ goodness, from Lorin Hochstein.

Spark Barcelona Meetup: Speeding up PySpark with Arrow

This Thursday I’m speaking about how PySpark got faster by using Arrow internally. If you are around Barcelona please join us! Note that the slides for this talk are not up yet!

📚 Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics by Dan Harris

(note there are affiliate links in here) This is the follow-up to 10% Happier. MfFS is good, offering a more practical take than the previous one. As books to stand on its own, 10% Happier is better though.

📽 10 tips for failing badly at microservices

This is a very fun talk about what you should do if you want to prevent (in an ironic way) your company from moving to a microservices-based architecture. You may get flashbacks to the Simple Sabotage Field Manual from the CIA.

Newsletter?

I’m considering converting this into a weekly newsletter in addition to a blog post. These days (since RSS went into limbo) most of my regular information comes from several newsletters I’m subscribed to, instead of me going directly to a blog. If this is also your case, subscribe by clicking here and if enough people join I’ll send these every Sunday night or so.
Written by Ruben Berenguel